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Most-Missed Theatrical Films (2010)

by on 2010/12/27

In alphabetical order, these five selections were the theatrical releases (or re-releases) I most missed seeing in 2010.


The American (2010)

George Clooney is a good reason to see a movie, but The American has an even better one:  Anton Corbijn.

The mastermind behind the public images of Depeche Mode, U2, and myriad stylish superstars, he moved beyond photography, through music videos, to the impressive Ian Curtis (Joy Division) biopic, Control.

With this film, I’m expecting a European thriller like Ronin, only this time interpreted by a European proper.


The “Complete” Metropolis (1927/2010)

What sci-fi geek or cinephile hasn’t heard about Metropolis?

I studied it at film school.  I own an original cut of it.  Its poster hangs in my home.  And yet — gulp! — I’ve always respected it more than enjoyed it.

I’m hoping this “complete” release will fix the situation.


Nowhere Boy (2009)

I will always regret not having picked up a book I once saw at a mall, The Day John Met Paul.

And I will always recall, with incredible fondness, Imagine: John Lennon and Backbeat.

Having said all of that . . . why wouldn’t I want to see Nowhere Boy as well?


Tron: Legacy (2010)

The original Tron was good . . . but not great.  As a kid I caught it in theatres and — while it looked impressive then — it never stuck in my affections.

Nearly thirty years along, we’ve been treated to significant upgrades, The Matrix perhaps the best of them all.

With the benefit of hindsight, will Legacy succeed?


Waiting for “Superman” (2010)

No, it’s not the latest from DC Comics.  It’s a documentary by Davis Guggenheim, whose Inconvenient Truth caught the world’s eye, if not their conviction.

Here he sounds an alarm about the failing of public education.  As a fan — and occasional believer — in such documentary work, I’m hoping for a shred of soothsaying in the inevitable onslaught of doom.


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